THE FEMINIST BODY: CONTINGENT, ONE UPON THE OTHER

Participant Review: Simone Couto (MFA AP14)

svaparticipants:

 Simone Couto (MFA AP14)

This text is based on the lecture Leaving a Mark—Painting Body/Gestural Body—Feminist Subjectivities, by the art historian Jovana Stokic (AP Faculty), the essay Body Art: Performing the Subject by Amelia Jones, and the work of artists Carolee Schneemann and Yayoi Kusama. I use these feminist historians and artists as examples because they reject conventional patriarchal artistic models organized around male artists and male subjectivity, as well as notions of art rooted in the object alone. Crucial to my argument is that performance of the 60s and 70s in particular, challenged the dominant patriarchal art historical tradition, pushing the boundaries of art towards the interconnectivity.

THE BODY TOWARDS SUBJECTIVITY

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Carolee Schneemann  | Eye Body: 36 Transformative Actions |1963

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In making the film itself a virtual consciousness, Nitoslawska and her team help us experience Schneemann’s profound difference as both an artist and a woman of her generation. Whereas many other groundbreaking artists around her looked to experimentation and theory as discrete elements and processes in the formation of their ideas and art, Schneemann seems to merge with phenomena and mind as organic wholes not to be broken down, but rather to be refashioned into new intertwining ways of experiencing them.   
 
 G. Roger Denson  writes for the Huffington Post  about  Breaking the Frame , a film by Marielle Nitoslawska about the art and life of  Carolee Schneemann  (AP Mentor). 

In making the film itself a virtual consciousness, Nitoslawska and her team help us experience Schneemann’s profound difference as both an artist and a woman of her generation. Whereas many other groundbreaking artists around her looked to experimentation and theory as discrete elements and processes in the formation of their ideas and art, Schneemann seems to merge with phenomena and mind as organic wholes not to be broken down, but rather to be refashioned into new intertwining ways of experiencing them. 

G. Roger Denson writes for the Huffington Post about Breaking the Frame, a film by Marielle Nitoslawska about the art and life of Carolee Schneemann (AP Mentor).