Hawley’s approach is complicated because he considers directive language, which lets us know what things are and how we are to use them, mediated through film and imagery. Among diagrammatic renderings, a German read of the manual, and the car itself, Passenger is an environment of descriptive hyperbole.  Theorist Roland Barthes noted that when we encounter an object, a narrative description arrives with it. The description is not mimetic; it carries the notions of the writer (or artist), so we translate an object’s meaning through his or her lens. Reality, for Barthes, is an effect, a result of language that constructs meaning. Although surrounded with ephemera that should let us know what Passenger’s car is, Hawley leaves direct reference to the car absent. Christa DiMarco writes for Title Magazine about Anthony Hawley’s (MFA AP14) current exhibition, Passenger at Vox Populi. 

Hawley’s approach is complicated because he considers directive language, which lets us know what things are and how we are to use them, mediated through film and imagery. Among diagrammatic renderings, a German read of the manual, and the car itself, Passenger is an environment of descriptive hyperbole.  Theorist Roland Barthes noted that when we encounter an object, a narrative description arrives with it. The description is not mimetic; it carries the notions of the writer (or artist), so we translate an object’s meaning through his or her lens. Reality, for Barthes, is an effect, a result of language that constructs meaning. Although surrounded with ephemera that should let us know what Passenger’s car is, Hawley leaves direct reference to the car absent.

Christa DiMarco writes for Title Magazine about Anthony Hawley’s (MFA AP14) current exhibition, Passenger at Vox Populi.